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Our visit to Vicky Grout’s home marks the continuation of our special collaboration between Sonos and Freunde von Freunden.

 

Vicky Grout's room is a cosy mish-mash of analogue cameras, boxes of trainers, and magazines crammed into every bookshelf

 

Grime is London’s latest music export. Just don’t get it twisted with hip-hop – it’s not the same thing. From Wiley pioneering the genre to Skepta becoming the vanguard for the new generation, grime has always had a tricky relationship with media. So how did Vicky Grout become a trusted part of the culture from behind the lens?

Step inside Vicky’s South London home and you’ll get a quick sense of how she’s become an authentic part of grime. Her room is a cosy mish-mash of analogue cameras, boxes of trainers, and magazines crammed into every bookshelf. Just like the rave scenes she started to frequent at 17-years-old, her room is thrumming with energy and bright splashes of colour.

“Hate photos. Love Vicky Grout.” – Skepta

Normally pitched in front of 140 bpm-blaring sound systems at East London raves, her room is a slight departure. Her PLAY:1s are softly playing old-school Detroit house while she edits images and replies to emails.

“I tend to listen to a lot of [mixes from online culture platform] Soulection. There’s one mix on there that Joe Kay did a couple of months ago and I realised it’s pretty much the only thing I can work to, it’s really therapeutic.”

 

Wherever grime and London street culture is headed, Vicky Grout is often right in the thick of it.

 

One prevailing theme throughout her photos is capturing off-guard moments. On surface-level, grime exhibits hype, often violent storytelling, and guarded mistrust of glossy London, but the genre itself has distinct humour, self-awareness, warmth, and self-deprecation. Vicky manages to catch all of it in her images, humanising grime in ways that most media outlets tend to ignore.

“I only really got into photography when I found my parents old point-and-shoot film camera. I’d just shoot on film because I didn’t really know how they worked, I just liked taking pictures of things, the raves I was going to, the things that interested me. I think you can tell that I shoot the music I listen to.”

Wherever grime and London street culture is headed, Vicky is often right in the thick of it. She’s a ball of enthusiasm, necessary for capturing the specific energy at raves or across the frenetic streets of London. Her genuine approach to special musical moments, connecting with artists, and humility despite the rapid fame keeps her grounded in the culture.

 

One prevailing theme throughout Vicky Grout's photos is capturing off-guard moments.

Photography by © Christian Cassiel
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